This page was last updated Fri 06 January 2017.

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Austria (all)

This page lists all reports that for Austria including those that involve other countries too.
Click here for a list of reports that involve only Austria.
All descriptions are in English, unless otherwise noted.

Tours (continued)

Bicycle Travelling in 24 Countries
by Peter Davis, tour started June 2005, submitted 4 February 2006

This webpage is intended to provide information for cycle tourists who may be considering tours in the countries I've visited. For more information, journals and pictures leave a message in my guestbook or send me an email.

`` Yes, it's hot. But we've seen worse haven't we my friend. There was that day east of Warnambol when the chip seal melted and the chips stuck to the tires. A few revolutions later we had flats front and rear. So we pushed for a mile seeking shade to repair the punctures. And the flies Ah! And there was that time in Zamorah. Ah! But not now.''

See all 2 reports by Peter Davis

On the legendary climbs, cols of the Giro d'Italia and Tour de Suisse
by Györgyi Gábor, tour started July 2005, submitted 1 February 2006

Although the tour that I had on the legendary climbs of the Tour de France in 2004 tempt me back to indulge in nostalgia, this year (2005) I decided to bicycle on the cols of the Giro d'Italia and the Tour de Suisse, and beside it to take part in the hard Fausto Coppi bicyclemarathon / gran fondo, which is a real challenge with its 187 km and has 4400m height difference.

Before the fantastic marathon, I bicycled to France to climb the Col de la Moutiere, and when I were there it was logical to climb also the 2802m Cime de la Bonette. Both cols are unforgettable.

Next to Briancon I enjoyed the nice Col du Granon (2413 m) which was not only steep but very beautiful. In 2005 at the Colle Finestre (Italia) there was a hard fight between profi Giro d'Italia racers; on my tour I had the most remarkable experience after a light rain, when the Sun could shine between the clouds.

In Switzerland I had cold weather for days, but I could climb nice cols. I loved Grimselm because I enjoyed very much the feeling of a triathlon race, and I loved Gotthard because its ``old'' feeling - thanks to the cobblestoned road.

In the last 3 days - through sunny weather - I went up to the legendary Passo Gavia, Passo Rombo / Timmelsjoch and last day the 2829m high Gletscherstrasse. The highest point on the last day!

See all 26 reports by Györgyi Gábor

Fantastic view: 3 kms from the 2802 m Cime de la Bonette (cycling from Col de la Moutiere)
Cycling the Danube Bikeway
by J Gaerlan, tour started May 2005, submitted 31 January 2006
Europe: Austria, Germany
language: english

Danube Bikeway starting from Passau, Germany to Vienna Austria.

Mountains, Rivers and Rivieras
by Justin Belcher, tour started April 2005, submitted 29 January 2006

It began as a crazy idea whilst on holiday in France back in 2003 and within a couple of weeks had turned into a serious plan. Now after two years preparation and a couple of false starts we're finally off.

The plan is to ride from our home in Chesham to the south coast city of Portsmouth where we can catch a boat to Bilbao on the north coast of Spain. Then we'll cross France to the Black Forest in Germany where we can pick up the famous Danube cycle path which we plan to follow to east to Vienna. After that we want to spend a couple of months in the Alps before heading south for a lap of Italy. The final leg of the tour will see us cross France again to the Pyrenees before we head south to Spain where we plan to follow the coast round to Portugal and back into Northern Spain where we can catch the boat back to England.

See all 2 reports by Justin Belcher

Jerry's Bicycling Trip in the Dolomites (7 days) 2000
by Jerry Nilson, tour started July 2000, submitted 15 January 2006
Europe: Italy, Austria

I thought it was not so difficult to go up to the Gavia pass, but it might have something to do with getting used to these long and steep climbs. I also learned from the italian the day before that the Gavia road had been paved since two years back all the way (something I was not totally sure on after reading about it elsewhere). The steep part begins at Sta Caterina Valfurva (1738 m). Before this I took the photo just beside here and it is apparently the Punta S. Matteo mountain top (3678 m) one sees here (it looked much better in real life!). I was a very beautiful road to go up and it seemed so nice and still it was difficult to really comprehend I would be in Milano later in the day. Just behind the corner where I took the photo, cows were walking up a terribly small path in the terribly steep hillside. I wondered if they would lose balance and fall down on me if I called at them. (Original text selected by Andreas C.)

See all 13 reports by Jerry Nilson

Staller Sattel/Passo Stalle
Jerry's Tour of the Alps 2004
by Jerry Nilson, tour started July 2004, submitted 15 January 2006

22 full days of cycling (I cycled a little the first day upon arriving at Nice and cycled 81 km on a travel day). I visited around 115 mountain passes. A total of 3532 km for 22 days (161 km/day). I climbed ca. 73078 m (3322 m/day). Maximum inclination/steepness: walking: 33% up Col de Traversette in snow; 42% down Grand col de Ferret. Steepest cycling was perhaps up Monte Zoncolan with 6 km at around 15% on average. Most difficult was probably Koralpenstrasse with an average gradient of 11,2% for the final 14,4 km, which make it into one of the hardest climbs in the Alps that could be cycled with a normal racer cycle. From snow to blazing sun around Nice. From Nice to Lavamünd and back again.

See all 13 reports by Jerry Nilson

Col du Sabot, Alps, France
Austria e Liechtenstein
by Davide Tambuchi, tour started 2004, submitted 28 December 2005
language: it

Quest'anno mi sono spostato un po' più ad est, visitando il piccolo Liechtenstein e la parte occidentale dell'Austria, sino a Salisburgo, con un ulteriore sconfinamento nella Baviera meridionale. Sempre con la mia fida Cannondale F600, e con lo stesso bagaglio dello scorso anno.

See all 15 reports by Davide Tambuchi

Memories from the Road
by Massimiliano Poletto, tour started June 1999, submitted 13 December 2005

In the summer of 1999 I cycled a little over 7000km across Europe, from Nordkapp, at the northern end of Norway, to Calabria, the southernmost region of Italy. It was the best bicycle ride and adventure of my life so far. This is my attempt to share what I saw and felt.

The Great Heart Travelers
by Julien Leblay, tour started 2004, submitted 28 November 2005
language: en, fr

``The Great Heart Travelers'' promote the blood donation riding around the world. They made a Europe tour of 5400 km in 2004, and a tour in New Zealand in 2005. (Follow the archive link at the bottom of the page to go to the European tour.)

See all 2 reports by Julien Leblay

Bicycle tours in Switzerland and Austria
by Davide Tambuchi, tour started 2000, submitted 5 November 2005
language: it

In this page you can find some links to my bicycle tour in Switzerland, Austria and Liechtenstein, from year 2000. From 2004 there are some photos available.

See all 15 reports by Davide Tambuchi

Radtour München - Mailand
by Hubert Becker, tour started June 1988, submitted 24 October 2005
language: de

Eine anspruchsvolle Radtour in 5 Tagesetappen über insgesamt 491 km, Tagesetappen zwischen 61 und 151 Kilometer.

See all 29 reports by Hubert Becker

Start in Munich
Cycling from Prague to Vienna
by Kevin Rodger, tour started September 2004, submitted 17 October 2005

This is a photo illustrated chronology of a six day bicycle trip from Prague, Czech Republic to Vienna, Austria in September, 2004.

Follow the adventures of Kevin, Tom and Paul, three Canadians as they tour through scenic countryside through towns with place names they could not pronounce.

See all 4 reports by Kevin Rodger

A tandem bike tour in the Czech Republic, Austria and Germany
by Brian Wasson, tour started May 2004, submitted 13 October 2005

This tandem-bike tour led us from Prague in the Czech Republic via Tabor, Ceske Budejovice and Cesky Krumlov to the border at Horni Dvoriste. The trip continued along Austria's Tauern bike route (Tauernradweg) from Krimml, Austria, up through Bad Reichenhall, Germany, and ending at Salzburg, Austria. The trip report contains many useful links and resources to assist other tourists in their trip planning.

See all 3 reports by Brian Wasson

A tandem bike tour on the Tauern bike path, Austria
by Brian Wasson, tour started May 2002, submitted 13 October 2005
Europe: Austria, Germany

A week-long tandem bike tour on the Tauern bike route (Tauernradweg) from Krimml, Austria to Passau, Germany. Daily trip notes, useful trip-planning links, and a comprehensive resources page with information about touring in Austria and Germany, using the train systems, etc. Tour report published in Oct. 2005.

See all 3 reports by Brian Wasson

Riding in the Tauern valley, Austria.
Five continents on the bike 2001-2006
by rolmaatjes, tour started August 2001, submitted 8 October 2005
language: nl

In 2001 vanuit Nederland vertrokken en nu okt 2005 meer dan 65.000 km en al meer dan 40 landen doorgefietst.

Op de achtergrond het beroemde operagebouw in Sydney
Danube Bike Trail
by Ralph Herbert, tour started May 2005
Europe: Germany, Austria

A photo diary of a 210 mile bicycle trip from Passau,Germany to Vienna,Austria in May 2005 with an initial stop in Regensburg, Germany.

See all 2 reports by Ralph Herbert

From Bassano to Munich by bike
by Fabio Ferronato, tour started August 2003
Europe: Germany, Austria, Italy

[A satellite] image [taken] just after I got back home [...] shows that there were no clouds on all the central Europe, very good for my round trip! The days before the images was likely, so I found only sun, sun and sun ! Maybe too much. In Munich the temperature was 38 degree!!!

See all 9 reports by Fabio Ferronato

At the Brenner Pass
A tour of the Alps on a tandem, July 2003
by Piaw Na and Lisa, tour started July 2003

My big impression is that this is the first tour where I feel like the scenery/riding is better than what I got at home here in the San Francisco Bay Area. After returning to the Bay Area, I went out for a 50 mile ride near my house, a ride that compares favorably with New Zealand, Scotland, Southern France (in the Pyrenees). In comparison with Switzerland, though - the road surface is not as good, the mountains aren't as high, the drivers rude, and the grass is indeed greener in Switzerland (here in California the grass is brown in the summer), and I missed the cowbells ringing in the hills. To make up for that we don't get nearly so much rain, and our passes are open all winter. Our mountain descents are also more challenging, mostly because the road surface is POOR compared to Switzerland' big passes, and also because the road engineering isn't anywhere up to par with Switzerland's. Switzerland's. hairpins turns, for instance, are almost nearly level, while around here the steepest parts of a climb are on the hairpins. As you can imagine, this makes cornering, climbing, and braking much easier in Switzerland. As a matter of fact, if you can handle San Francisco Bay Area climbs and descents, you are ready for anything you will encounter in Switzerland.

Jerry's Tour of the Dolomites and Central Alps
by Jerry Nilson, tour started 2003

I cycled for 16 days and climbed 58624 m (which is 3664 m on average per day). It was 2381 km (which is 148.8 km on average per day). These figures are a bit lower than for the previous year, mainly because I visited more unpaved mountain roads (otherwise they would likely had been higher). It was between 10 (first day at the race it was much cooler in the morning) and 41° Celsius. The maximum speed was down the Kühtai pass at 91 km/h (new record for me). Steepest road I cycled was Ischgl-Viderjoch with several kilometres above 20%. Steepest road I did not cycle was down to Switzerland from Viderjoch, with ramps at 45% on average. I had thunderstorms, I had three punctures (one on asphalt and two on gravel), and a car incident in Schwaz, Austria (early on day 17 out of 21 planned days of cycling) where I got a fracture in the back and was hospitalized. (Fortunately, I fully recovered after 3-4 months.) I visited around 119 passes (106 new passes, with perhaps 100 officially recognized ones).

See all 13 reports by Jerry Nilson

Campolongo
Austria, Czech Republic, Germany and Switzerland
by Norman D. Ford, tour started 2003

From Vienna to Switzerland's Rhine Falls via some of Europe's most extravagent castles, walled medieval towns and Bavarian villages filled with painted houses. Packed with how-to-do-it hints and tips.

See all 13 reports by Norman D. Ford

The towers and spires of Neuschwanstein Castle soar above the bike paths of Fuessen in Bavaria
Tour of the Alps 2003
by Jobst Brandt, tour started 2003

We descended to Selva di Cadore (1336m) and headed east to Passo Staulanza (1773m) along the Torrente Fiorentina all the while heading straight for Monte Pelmo (3168m). The Staulanza is an easy pass and comes as a surprise because there is no apparent gap past Monte Pelmo. After a hairpin turn just before the mountain, the pass shows up unexpectedly.

Typical of the Dolomites, this route is a scenic wonder. We rode to Longarone (472m), notorious for the dam disaster at 22:42 on 09 October 1963 when the town was destroyed by a ``tidal wave'', that a landslide from Monte Toc (1921m) had forced over a dam and through a narrow gulch across from the town, to claim 1909 lives. Our hotel as, most in that area, had many before and after pictures on its walls.

[The following day] we started out under blue skies that gradually turned cloudy as the day passed. We crossed the valley and rode up the granite wall through tunnels as we headed to the gap of death for Longarone. Below, carved into the vertical wall, we saw the old road notched and tunneled into the gorge as we passed tunnel openings in our road. Then we saw the hollow arch of the dam, still intact, with only a bit of the rim cracked of on the far side. It is less than 50m across but at least three times that high, narrowing to almost nothing at its bottom.

After the last tunnel we emerged just above the dam that still has a bit of water between it and the mountain that slid into the former lake. A memorial chapel by Corbusier stands vigil over this disaster.

See all 20 reports by Jobst Brandt

Austria Photos
by Ken Brown, tour started October 2002
Europe: Austria

A really beautiful collection of photographs from his October 2002 tour along the Tauern Radweg from Krimml to Salzburg to Passau, and then the Danube from Passau to Vienna. Includes a written account of the trip.

See all 2 reports by Ken Brown

The view was worth the climb
Da Treviso al Paradiso - Dolomites and Alps by Bike
by Allan Nelson, Konrad Orlowski, and Francesco Bille, tour started May 2002
Europe: Italy, Austria

An account of a two week cycle tour in May 2002 from Treviso (Italy) to Salzburg (Austria), via the Dolomites and the Austrian Alps.

This has to go down as one of those 'truly memorable' tours. The scenery was awesome, the company, perfect, the roads, quiet, the saunas, hot, the weather (yes, some of that was memorable!). It must have been good, I took over 250 photo's!

We were looking for a catchy name for the site, and 'Through Mel to Hell' was suggested, but that implies it was awful. It wasn't in any way (though the wet slog up the Fedaia Pass was, how can we put this, character forming). If anything, some of the weather, especially on the Grossglockner, made the trip even more memorable. I think 'Da Treviso al Paradiso' sums it up quite nicely, even if we did go through a little 'hell' to get there. At times, I think we really did feel like 'I Tre Moschettieri!'. All for one and one for all.

See all 2 reports by Allan Nelson, Konrad Orlowski, and Francesco Bille

On the cycling path from San Candido/Innichen to Lienz
Central Europe by bike 2002 - a travelogue
by Karl Andersson, tour started 2002

A journey through Sweden, Germany, Czech Republic, Austria and Poland, by Karl Andersson. I am Karl Andersson from Sweden. This website is about the 2700 kilometers (1688 miles) that I biked from Stockholm to Kraków in the summer of 2002. You won't find the usual gear and packlist pages on this site. Instead, I've decided to share with you the diary I wrote every evening, slightly edited. A travelogue from the road. It's all there: The hellish days in former East Germany, the rain and wind that threatened to make me quit. Why would anyone do such a biketour, and that alone? My answer to this very frequent question among my couchpotato friends is: Why not? But OK, there's more to it...

Fernsehturm and Palast der Republik in Berlin
From Tyrol to Alsace 2002 via Italy and Switzerland
by Carsten Gregersen, tour started 2002

From Carsten's Cycling Web. While it's still high summer I begin three weeks of mountain bike holidays together with a couple of friends. Ten days later we ride through a snow-covered scenery on our way across Bielerhöhe. Forced by the cold weather we change our plans to avoid the highest summits. Even the cattle have had enough and return from the green summer pastures to the warm cow houses. Nevertheless, we have some nice days off-road. One of the attractions is Val d'Uina with a just 1.5 m wide hiking track blasted into the rock wall over a of 600 m distance. As a prelude to the tour we participate in Ötztaler Radmarathon.

See all 11 reports by Carsten Gregersen

Vanoise National Park
Through the Habsburg Empire: Cycle tour Prague-Vienna-Prague
by Terje Melheim, tour started 2002

Information about the Greenway between Prague and Vienna. We decided upon this route for our cycle tour of 2002. We took the plane to Prague. It turned out that the Greenway did not start in the city of Prague itself. We had to take the metro to the starting point of the route, outside the town. At the terminus of the metro it was not too easy to find our way, because we avoided the large roads and took roads with little traffic. Such roads are hardly marked on the maps. We ended up on a track through a forest, and we had no idea where we were. We saw quite many other cyclists doing excursions in the rural area near the town and I had to ask one for the road. I was quite relieved when I could understand the instructions which I received from the friendly cyclist. Cyclists understand each other in spite of different languages. Then, in Újezd we saw the first sign of our way towards Vienna - 425 km. Throughout the Czech Republic minor roads, which are good to cycle on and which lead to interesting sites, have been designated as cycle routes. Small, yellow signs have been put up, so if your map is not good enough, you will always be on the right way by following the signs. Various local cycle routes have been combined to form the Prague-Vienna Greenway.

When we had crossed the border to Austria, sign posts of another design pointed out the route towards Vienna. On our way back to Prague we followed the famous and highly frequented cycle way along the river Danube. From Linz on the Danube we headed north towards Prague and the airport, with stops at famous sites like Ceský Krumlov and Ceske Budejuvice.

See all 10 reports by Terje Melheim

Impressions from Slavonice with its graffiti decorations
Tyrol and the Dolomites
by Carsten Gregersen, tour started 2002
Europe: Austria, Italy

The mountain bike is ready and the trailer has been packed with tent, sleeping bag and cooking gear. New cycling adventures are in the offing. The Dachstein area with the many surrounding lakes is one of the most beautiful in Austria. Into the bargain there should be very good opportunities for riding off-road. Tempting are also the large plains in the Dolomites further south. Unfortunately the weather puts a damper on the enthusiasm. It turns into the rainiest summer within living memory.

See all 11 reports by Carsten Gregersen

Platzwiesen/Prato Piazza
Germany and Austria
by Norman D. Ford, tour started 2002
Europe: Austria, Germany

Through the Heart of Europe on Germany's Romantic Road and Altmuhl River Bike Paths, and on Down the Danube almost to Vienna.

I've just spent 16 memorable days cycling beside the rivers of Bavaria and Austria on a network of mostly paved and car-free bike paths. Day-by-day, I pedalled through a series of almost perfectly preserved towns and villages straight out of the Middle Ages. Many were enclosed by still-intact city walls. Entering the walls through a gate in a massive watchtower, I would pedal through a maze of crooked, cobblestoned streets lined by half-timbered medieval houses to picturesque squares with centuries-old churches and soaring Gothic towers.

Out in the country, I cycled on level bike paths beside scenic rivers. The bike paths themselves may have been flat and easy to pedal. But they were full of hidden delights and surprises. Flat sections led through farmlands dotted with scarlet poppies and a patchwork quilt of blazing yellow rapeseed fields. Elsewhere, rivers like the Danube wound between steep, forested mountains where hilltop castles, monasteries and abbeys loomed over the landscape.

Altogether, I cycled along three of Europe's most famous and popular Radwegs (bike paths): the Romantische Strasse and Altmuhltal Radwegs of Germany, and the Donau Radweg (Danube Bike Path) which runs through both Bavaria and Austria. The entire region is rich in history, and towns and villages along the way were on every tour bus itinerary. But the tourist buses miss the many unspoiled and half- forgetton villages, and the spectacular river panoramas, that only bicyclists get to see. Bicycling is undoubtedly the one best way to explore this wonderful region--better, in my opinion, than seeing it from one of the many deluxe cruise boats that ply the Danube.

See all 13 reports by Norman D. Ford

Traditional Half-timbered Houses in Dinkelsbuhl
Da Treviso al Paradiso - Dolomites and Alps by Bike
by Allan Nelson, Konrad Orlowski, and Francesco Bille, tour started 2002
Europe: Italy, Austria

An account of a two week cycle tour in May 2002 from Treviso (Italy) to Salzburg (Austria), via the Dolomites and the Austrian Alps.

This has to go down as one of those 'truly memorable' tours. The scenery was awesome, the company, perfect, the roads, quiet, the saunas, hot, the weather (yes, some of that was memorable!). It must have been good, I took over 250 photo's!

We were looking for a catchy name for the site, and 'Through Mel to Hell' was suggested, but that implies it was awful. It wasn't in any way (though the wet slog up the Fedaia Pass was, how can we put this, character forming). If anything, some of the weather, especially on the Grossglockner, made the trip even more memorable. I think 'Da Treviso al Paradiso' sums it up quite nicely, even if we did go through a little 'hell' to get there. At times, I think we really did feel like 'I Tre Moschettieri!'. All for one and one for all.

See all 2 reports by Allan Nelson, Konrad Orlowski, and Francesco Bille

On the cycling path from San Candido/Innichen to Lienz
Da Trento all'isola di Krk
by Dario Pedrotti, tour started 2002
language: it

13 tappe e 880 km lungo i fiumi di Austria Slovenia e Croazia.

Il giro è molto bello e non eccessivamente faticoso. Si trovano delle ottime cartine fino a Maribor (Da Dobbiaco è tutta ciclabile, la Drauweg), un po' meno in Slovenia e Croazia, dove ciclabili praticamente non ce ne sono, ma ci sono parecchie strade secondarie senza traffico. In Slovenia agli uffici turistici si possono trovare cartine della zona decenti (noi ci siamo accontentati di quelle, ma consigliamo caldamente di procurarvi una carta almeno al 200.000, possibilmente con le curve di livello?) e un paio di pubblicazioni interessanti, anche in Italiano, su ``Slovenia in bicicletta'' e ``Le strade secondarie sono più accattivanti di quelle principali''. Aiutano molto. Non fate troppo affidamento sui cartelli segnaletici delle presunte piste ciclabili (``kolesarska pot'', in sloveno) che a volte mancano. Sulla strada che abbiamo scelto noi abbiamo incontrato traffico solo in alcuni punti che non avevano alternative, andando a ficcarci in strade impossibili solo un paio di volte, evitabili.

See all 3 reports by Dario Pedrotti

Tour of the Alps 2002
by Jobst Brandt, tour started 2002

I rode along the Vermenagna River below the Tenda rail line, famous for being either in a tunnel or on a bridge most of the 80km from Borgo San Dalmazzo to Ventimiglia and Nice. The river and its tributaries had ripped out bridges and carried away parts of the road in recent floods. While the railway gained altitude in looping tunnels and bridges and vanished in the mountain for long stretches, I cruised up the 4% grade to Limone (990m), where the climb to the highway tunnel begins and the 8090m-long Tenda Railway Tunnel, completed in 1913, bores through the mountain to Vievola. [...]

See all 20 reports by Jobst Brandt

The unpaved Tenda road in 1989
Nederland Azie op die fiets
by Jurgen en Saskia, tour started September 2001
language: nl

Ja, hebben jullie het al gezien, we zijn meer dan 4 jaar onderweg. Wat een tijd en toch.... we genieten er nog elke dag van. Nu zijn we in Jujuy, noord Argentinië. Via Chili gaan we binnenkort naar Bolivia, waar we een tijdlang niet zullen kunnen internetten. We zullen op grote hoogte gaan fietsen, hoogtes waar we nog niet eerder waren. Of dat prettig is.. jullie zullen het later lezen.

München-Cesenatico
by ADFC, tour started May 2001
Europe: Germany, Austria, Italy
language: de

In fünf Tagesetappen (130 km -160 km) führt die Radfernfahrt des ADFC Bayern von München an die sonnige Adriaküste. Gemeinsam mit 200 anderen Radbegeisterten erfahren die TeilnehmerInnen die atemberaubende Landschaft der Alpenwelt und Norditaliens. In Cesenatico, dem Zielort, locken drei weitere Tagestouren durch die Hügellandschaft der Emilia Romagna. Höhepunkt der zehntägigen Radfernfahrt ist die Teilnahme an der weltberühmten Radtouristikfahrt Nove Colli.

Start der Radler zur Nove Colli in Cesenatico
Julien & Titus' Cycling Trip, 12195km in Europe
by Julien Dymetryszyn, tour started March 2001

[Titus is the bike] - 12195 km in 8 months through France, Spain, Portugal, Morocco, England, Wales, Northern Ireland, Republic of Ireland, Scotland, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Germany, the Netherlands, Luxembourg, Austria, Italy and Greece - includes travelogue and many fine pictures

I've travelled quite a bit through the years, hiking on foot, by car, bus, plane... But cycling is just the right speed. Fast enough to actually get someplace, yet slow enough to smell the flowers as you go... Plus, it's the only mode of transportation where the engine actually improves with usage... Anyways, a friend lent me this book about a couple who spent a couple of years cycling around the world and I thought to myself that I wanted to do that ! So, off I went ! Well, I didn't quite make it... After 8 months on the road, I came back... Mostly due to homesickness, but I should have expected that, particularly on a solo trip...

Mid-morning after leaving Santillana [in Northern Spain], I take a break after a long cycle uphill and watch the progress of this little fellow... That's exactly how I felt... slow... but steady!

See all 3 reports by Julien Dymetryszyn

That's exactly how I felt... slow... but steady!
Through the Alps of France, Switzerland and Austria, 2001
by Norman D. Ford, tour started 2001

From the Vercors of France through Switzerland's Bernese Oberland to the Austrian Tyrol. The itinerary traverses a series of world class bike rides including Gorge de La Bourne, Les Grands Goulets, and Combe Laval in the Vercors; the North Face of the Eiger, Lauterbrunnen Valley, and Grosse Scheideg in the Bernese Oberland; then via the Furka and Oberalp Passes and down the Rhine to Chur and Lichtenstein and by the Tauern Radweg to Zell am See.

I also give full advice and information sources for anyone wishing to cycle this same route or to go elsewhere by Switzerland's National Bike Routes or by Austria's 30 Official Bike Routes. This trip was done in May and June 2001. Will add photos soon.

See all 13 reports by Norman D. Ford

Tour of the Alps 2001
by Jobst Brandt, tour started 2001

[...] We crossed the to the north side of the Lenta and climbed above the clouds into a brilliantly clear blue sky as we broke out of this box canyon through cliffs and bare rock tunnels, above the high waterfall into the Gorge de la Lenta. Here we entered a wintry scene with empty chair lifts running in anticipation of skiers from Val d'Isere on the other side of the pass. In one more zigzag, similar to the lower climb, brought us to the summit. Although we were in summer clothing, our leather gloves came in handy.

At the summit we took pictures sitting on the large concrete and stone Col del l'Iseran (2770m) sign, something I first did in 1960. We found a photographer, a guy from Colorado, who had slept in his car at the summit that he had reached in the heightof the snow storm late at night. Without chains, he thought the next day would be safer, and it was.

See all 20 reports by Jobst Brandt

Trip To Austria and Bavaria
by Andrea and Mike Venamore, tour started 2001
Europe: Austria, Germany

Photos, a diary and information about their holiday riding by bicycle up the Danube and other rivers from Vienna to Salzkammergut. [...] We cycled some 560km up the Danube, Inn and Salzach Rivers, riding from Vienna to the Salzkammagut area just outside Salzburg. It was a brilliant way to see some great parts of Austria and Bavaria. [...]

We took our own bikes and managed some 40 to 60km a day. The bikepaths over there are fantastic, well maintained and usually dedicated cycle paths (ie no cars). So it was relatively safe riding. Accommodation was generally easy to get...when we were tired we rode into the nearest town or village to get a bed for the night. We stayed in hotels, pensions, B&B's (``Zimmer Frei's'') and Youth Hostels. Staying in the Youth Hostels was fun...but imagine having breakfast with 200 kids!!

Hans the boatman on the bicycle ferry
Switzerland Bike Tour 2000 - A Photo Journal from Bavaria to Italy
by Bob Parry, tour started August 2000

[This is] the web site for our 25-day cycling tour in Europe. We flew from Cleveland, Ohio, and Madison, Wisconsin, to Munich, Germany, taking our bikes and panniers. Our bike trip was a 600-mile (930 kilometers) loop from Bavaria to Switzerland, south to the Italian border, and returning to Munich by way of Austria. The following photo journal displays some of the highlights of our self-designed tour.

Our group of five friends biked about 40 miles per day and stayed in quaint, small hotels and youth hostels like this nearly 500-year old chalet in Brugg, Switzerland. [The cyclists were] Bonnie Vargo, Pam Galka, Ed James, Bob Parry and Russ Marx.

See all 3 reports by Bob Parry

Marcote, Switzerland on Lake Lugano
Wien - Budapest in bicicletta
by Andrea Tonegato, tour started May 2000
Europe: Austria, Hungary
language: it

A short tabular tour description.

See all 3 reports by Andrea Tonegato

Warsawa - Budapest - Venezia
by Louis Tousignant, tour started September 1999

My name is Louis Tousignant, a Canadian in his mid fifties, living in Nova Scotia on the Atlantic shore. Having cycled Copenhagen to Rome in 1998, and the U.K. in the mid 80's, it seemed a good idea to try Eastern Europe. As an eager amateur photographer, I particularly wanted to see Krakow, Prague and Budapest. Having had a grand time in Italy the year before, I also wanted to see Venice, a must... before one dies... Ergo this trip which I enjoyed tremendously.

This 52 day trip included 33 days of touring (3003 km for a 91 km/day average) and 19 days of travel and tourism. The load, minus water, was 20 kg, distributed in 4 saddle bags and one camera bag on the rear rack.

See all 4 reports by Louis Tousignant

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