This page was last updated Thu 05 January 2017.

Contents: Tours (404)    Trails (13)    Sites (12)    Cycling info pages (18)    Organizations and clubs (5)   

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France (all)

This page lists all reports that for France including those that involve other countries too.
Click here for a list of reports that involve only France.
All descriptions are in English, unless otherwise noted.

Tours (continued)

Illana and Amnon's Cycle Tour Diary
by Illana and Amnon, tour started August 2001

My wife and I recently returned from our cycling trip through the UK, France, a bit of Germany, Switzerland and Italy, roughly 4,500kms. It would be of special interest to any Jewish readers, as we observed all the Kosher and Sabbath ``constraints'' while cycling.

See all 4 reports by Illana and Amnon

Trevor and Thea's 2001 Tour de Provence
by Trevor and Thea Warwick, tour started July 2001
Europe: France

Some friend's weather horrors of last year prompted us to 1) go somewhere with good weather and 2) hire a car to introduce more off-bike possibilities. Provence fitted the weather bill [...] So: Just drive carefully, and expect every blind corner to have someone in a battered 106 coming too fast the other way in the middle of the road, and you won't go far wrong.

See all 5 reports by Trevor and Thea Warwick

Radtour Thonon - Nizza / Route des Grandes Alpes
by Hubert and Uschi Becker, tour started July 2001
Europe: France
language: de

Eine anspruchsvolle Radtour in 8 Tagesetappen über insgesamt 620 km durch die französischen Alpen; Tagesetappen zwischen 64 und 95 Kilometer.

That's an itinerary used by a lot of people. It's a route for hardcore bikers. That's the reason why so many reports are published about this famous route though the Alpes. It is a part of 'Le Tour de France' with all its fascination.

See all 3 reports by Hubert and Uschi Becker

Route des Grandes Alpes
Illana and Amnon's Cycle Tour Diary
by Illana and Amnon, tour started May 2001

My wife and I recently returned from our cycling trip through the UK, France, a bit of Germany, Switzerland and Italy, roughly 4,500kms. It would be of special interest to any Jewish readers, as we observed all the Kosher and Sabbath ``constraints'' while cycling.

See all 4 reports by Illana and Amnon

Illana and Amnon's Cycle Tour Diary - May to September 2001
by Illana and Amnon, tour started May 2001

My wife and I recently returned from our cycling trip through the UK, France, a bit of Germany, Switzerland and Italy, roughly 4,500kms. It would be of special interest to any Jewish readers, as we observed all the Kosher and Sabbath ``constraints'' while cycling.

See all 4 reports by Illana and Amnon

Illana and Amnon's Cycle Tour Diary
by Illana and Amnon, tour started May 2001

My wife and I recently returned from our cycling trip through the UK, France, a bit of Germany, Switzerland and Italy, roughly 4,500kms. It would be of special interest to any Jewish readers, as we observed all the Kosher and Sabbath ``constraints'' while cycling.

See all 4 reports by Illana and Amnon

Central France: Massif Central
by Thomas Driemeyer, tour started May 2001
Europe: France

Alès is a quiet town at the southern edge of the Massif Central, France's central mountains. We stayed the night in Alès and entered the mountains the next morning. The ride from Alès to Le Puy on D906 was clearly the highlight of the entire tour. (Also, as it happens, my birthday.) The road winds its way through the deep narrow valleys of the mountains. There is very little traffic, and gorgeous views at every bend of the road.

See all 20 reports by Thomas Driemeyer

Paris-Roubaix 21-23 April 2001
by Simon Barnes, tour started April 2001
Europe: France

This is my account of a trip to France to ride the Paris Roubaix race route. Being an ex- amateur racing cyclist and a devoted fan of cycle racing it has always been an ambition of mine and having spent many years watching the race on Eurosport I finally decided to give it a go. The route was plotted on a map from Internet race route details and constant study of video coverage. My brother Jong agreed to join me and my girlfriend Allison agreed to act as our `back up' vehicle. We rode standard race bikes with 700c x 23 tyres (Kevlar). Mine is equipped with carbon forks and Jong's with steel straight forks and apart from routine maintenance we set off with no special precautions.

The 2001 edition of the race was run off the previous weekend in absolute hellish conditions and we were afraid that we would encounter the same. The week before we went was accompanied with strong cold Northerly winds and constant downpours of hail and sleet so I was very nervous. The race is steeped in legend, `Hell of the North' etc but in fact is a very pleasant and interesting route (when dry!) and is virtually untouched by traffic beyond Bohain. We enjoyed it immensely and I would recommend it but unless you are a real purist like me then don't bother with the Compiegne - St Quentin leg.

Julien & Titus' Cycling Trip, 12195km in Europe
by Julien Dymetryszyn, tour started March 2001

[Titus is the bike] - 12195 km in 8 months through France, Spain, Portugal, Morocco, England, Wales, Northern Ireland, Republic of Ireland, Scotland, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Germany, the Netherlands, Luxembourg, Austria, Italy and Greece - includes travelogue and many fine pictures

I've travelled quite a bit through the years, hiking on foot, by car, bus, plane... But cycling is just the right speed. Fast enough to actually get someplace, yet slow enough to smell the flowers as you go... Plus, it's the only mode of transportation where the engine actually improves with usage... Anyways, a friend lent me this book about a couple who spent a couple of years cycling around the world and I thought to myself that I wanted to do that ! So, off I went ! Well, I didn't quite make it... After 8 months on the road, I came back... Mostly due to homesickness, but I should have expected that, particularly on a solo trip...

Mid-morning after leaving Santillana [in Northern Spain], I take a break after a long cycle uphill and watch the progress of this little fellow... That's exactly how I felt... slow... but steady!

See all 3 reports by Julien Dymetryszyn

That's exactly how I felt... slow... but steady!
Through the Alps of France, Switzerland and Austria, 2001
by Norman D. Ford, tour started 2001

From the Vercors of France through Switzerland's Bernese Oberland to the Austrian Tyrol. The itinerary traverses a series of world class bike rides including Gorge de La Bourne, Les Grands Goulets, and Combe Laval in the Vercors; the North Face of the Eiger, Lauterbrunnen Valley, and Grosse Scheideg in the Bernese Oberland; then via the Furka and Oberalp Passes and down the Rhine to Chur and Lichtenstein and by the Tauern Radweg to Zell am See.

I also give full advice and information sources for anyone wishing to cycle this same route or to go elsewhere by Switzerland's National Bike Routes or by Austria's 30 Official Bike Routes. This trip was done in May and June 2001. Will add photos soon.

See all 13 reports by Norman D. Ford

Vier auf einen Streich: Eine Fahrradreise durch Deutschland, Frankreich, Schweiz, Italien zur Insel Elba
by Hans Jürgen Stang, tour started 2001
language: de

Elba hat eine wechselvolle Geschichte hinter sich: Griechen, Etrusker, Römer, Spanier, Engländer ständig wechselten die Herrscher. Mediterrane Flora und blau schimmernde Buchten erwarten uns. Aber auch für unsere Begriffe viel zu viel motorisierter Verkehr. Bei Aquaviva treffe ich meine Schwester, die hier ihren Urlaub verbringt und schon sind wir Tagesgespräch im Hotel. Wir nehmen unser erstes und letztes Bad im Meer und uns wird langsam bewußt, daß wir am Endpunkt unserer Reise angekommen sind. Wir wollen noch einmal die Ruhe und Stille genießen und fahren deshalb hoch in die Berge.

Eine erlebnisreiche Reise und 1750 Km mit dem Rad liegen hinter uns. Interessant auch die Tatsache, daß wir uns trotz des Altersunterschiedes (40 62) gut zusammen arrangiert haben. Ein gemeinsames Ziel verbindet eben und schweißt zusammen. Etwas, was in unserer heutigen Zeit zunehmend verloren zu gehen scheint.

See all 5 reports by Hans Jürgen Stang

Tour of the Alps 2001
by Erik Carlsson & Eric Salomonsson, tour started 2001

From Barcelona to Venezia (including [among others] Provence and the Dolomites).

Erik had spent the winter looking at pictures of famous Alpine passes, and that's where we were going. Languedoc and Provence also caught our attention, as did Costa Brava in Spain. We therefore decided to start our journey in Barcelona (which we passed through on our Iberia Tour 1999) and to finish in Venice (where we had been during the Touring Italia 1998).

We both signed up in the winter to participate in the ``Vätternrundan'' (a one-day 300k event in mid-June around the second largest lake in Sweden), and trained more than 1000 km during the spring. This training was absolutely necessary, not only for the ``Vätternrundan'', but also for the very hilly tour. In the end, after five weeks, we saw that we had had no more than three days without mountains. The first day through Barcelona, one day along the coast in Southern France and the last day on the plains to Venice. We were also certain that it would not be our last tour in the Alps. The climbs were hard, but the views and encouragements from other cyclists and car-drivers made it all more than worth-while. You are hardly ever alone as a cyclist. Standing on the summit after an hour or more of climbing you feel just as great as when you sweep through the switchbacks, going downhill for tens of kilometers on end!

See all 7 reports by Erik Carlsson & Eric Salomonsson

You are almost never alone biking in the Alps
Tour of the Alps 2001
by Jobst Brandt, tour started 2001

[...] We crossed the to the north side of the Lenta and climbed above the clouds into a brilliantly clear blue sky as we broke out of this box canyon through cliffs and bare rock tunnels, above the high waterfall into the Gorge de la Lenta. Here we entered a wintry scene with empty chair lifts running in anticipation of skiers from Val d'Isere on the other side of the pass. In one more zigzag, similar to the lower climb, brought us to the summit. Although we were in summer clothing, our leather gloves came in handy.

At the summit we took pictures sitting on the large concrete and stone Col del l'Iseran (2770m) sign, something I first did in 1960. We found a photographer, a guy from Colorado, who had slept in his car at the summit that he had reached in the heightof the snow storm late at night. Without chains, he thought the next day would be safer, and it was.

See all 20 reports by Jobst Brandt

Photo album of our trip to France
by Arnaud Louet (Arno), Phil and Kiki, tour started 2001
Europe: France

Covering the Loire and the Coast.

Heading for the coast, towards Noirmoutier Island
Jerry's Tour le Pyrenées - Eleven days in the Pyrenées
by Jerry Nilson, tour started 2001
Europe: France

I soon was on my way up to Col d'Azet (1580 m) - it was blazingly hot so I was lucky I stayed by the shop before starting the second climb of the day. There were really many cyclists out now as the Tour de France was now only something like three hour behind us ;-). At the start of the real climb there were two italians who passed by me looking very serious and I again could not help but try to figure out just how good these chaps could be. I noticed they got slightly irritated by not be able to shake me off, although they at a few places got away from me a couple of meters, I simply did not give up and always catched up with them. When approaching the top I for some reason got some extra strength and just slowly raised the speed until they both had to give up and they stopped to shake hands with me at the top and a waiting girlfriend (of them) took the photo here. The average speed up this climb was around 14 km/h, which I think is rather good for an amateur like me. The Tour de France riders do not go terribly much faster really (maybe up to 18 km/h perhaps - do not exactly though).

This was a smaller road and, as often on narrower roads, it were very nice scenery around there, as you could see. It was a somewhat hilarious ride down to the valley below and I continued down the valley to Arreau where I had lunch. Now I had taken off from the Tour route for the day (they were going to Plan d'Adet - just across the valley from the Azet col).

I thought I should now take it a bit easier and not compete. I started gently on my way up to Col d'Aspin (1489 m), but soon there were an englishman (from the Docklands in London) passing by me and I changed my speed a little and followed him. We were both raising the speed a little and it thus turned into yet another competition (with almost as many people on the side of the road as previously despite that this was the Tour road for tomorrow). Well, a bit easier than with the Italians I sprinted away from him at the top of the Col and we talked a little and had someone take a photo of us both.

See all 13 reports by Jerry Nilson

Jerry Nilson at the Tourmalet
Radtour München - Provence
by Hubert and Uschi Becker, tour started August 2000
Europe: Germany, Italy, France
language: de

Eine anspruchsvolle Radtour in 14 Tagesetappen über insgesamt 1281 km durch Deutschland, Österreich, Italien, die Schweiz und Frankreich; Tagesetappen zwischen 73 und 144 Kilometern. Die Radtour München - Provence führt von München über das Timmelsjoch nach Meran, dann weiter über den Gampenpaß und Passo del Tonale nach Edolo. Entlang an den oberitalienischen Seen geht nach Turin. Über den Montgenèvre erreichen wir Frankreich. Krönender Abschluß ist eine Umrundung der Gorge du Verdon. In Fayence in der Provence endet die Tour.

See all 3 reports by Hubert and Uschi Becker

Hubert and Uschi Becker at Timmelsjoch/Rombo
A bike ride to Santiago de Compostela
by John Layte, tour started July 2000
Europe: France, Spain

This web site is really just a day to day account of my 2000 mile lone cycle ride undertaken in July and August 2000. Most of my friends thought I was mad to try it at the age of 56 especially since I had never cycled much further than the local pub before. Had done no training, and my fifteen year old MBK mountain bike and heavy tent and things were hardly high tech. Yes I probably was mad but as things turned out most of the trip was great fun and I had very few problems, not even any aches and pains after the first couple of days.

Near Gouarec on the banks of the Brest to Nantes canal
Trans-Spain Cycle Tour
by Matthew Brown, tour started July 2000
Europe: Spain, France

A 2200km ride starting from Bordeaux on the French side of the Pyrenees, and finishing at the rock of Gibraltar off the South West of Spain. We averaged 100km/day, taking a mountainous route through 4 major mountain ranges - the Pyrenees, El Maestrat/Sierra de Cuenca, Sierra de Alcaraz/Cazorla and the Sierra Nevada.
Includes Map, Diary, Kit List, Pictures, Mechanicals, and Quotes...
``The pain in Spain falls mainly on the moun-tain''
``May the flies of a thousand camels infest the armpits of your children''

Sierra de Cuenca
Europe is small: London to Eindhoven
by Wieler Touring Club Café Wilhelmina, tour started June 2000
language: nl

The 450 km London-Eindhoven tour will take place at June 24th of the year 2000 when we will start at 02.00 AM Greenwich Mean Time at the Piccadilly Circus. The London-Eindhoven tour is part of our project ``Europe is small'' because the center of major European cities are all within 24 hr cycling distance from Eindhoven. In 1997 we did start at the Arc de Triomphe for Paris-Eindhoven. This year we will do the London-Eindhoven tour and in 2002 Berlin-Eindhoven will be on the program.

See all 2 reports by Wieler Touring Club Café Wilhelmina

Radtour auf Korsika (Corsica/Corse)
by Hubert and Uschi Becker, tour started May 2000
Europe: France
language: de

Nice report - includes route details and photographs.

See all 3 reports by Hubert and Uschi Becker

Corsica's Wild West
Gorges of Southern France
by Norman D. Ford, tour started May 2000
Europe: France

Starting at the mountain acropolis of Najac, I biked for 17 days along incredibly scenic rivers--the Aveyron, Lot, Cele, Dourdou, Truyere and Tarn--rivers that meander through deep gorges and loop around ancient villages and majestic chateaux. En route, I rode through some of the most delightful villages in France, which in Languedoc included several fortified cliffhanger villages built by the Cathars in the 12th century and looted by Simon de Montfort. Other highlights on this ride included medieval Conques, St. Cirque La Popie, Entraygues, Estaing, Florac and the Cevennes, the immense Gorge du Tarn and an exciting ride over the mountains of Haut Languedoc to Carcassonne. The day-by-day report not only describes my experiences but also tells how to duplicate my route.

See all 13 reports by Norman D. Ford

Marche, Umbria, Toscana
by Thomas Driemeyer, tour started May 2000
Europe: France

Ascoli Piceno is an almost perfectly conserved medieval town. The buildings are ancient, and many roads are narrow, winding, cobblestoned paths. We stayed at the youth hostel, which is an 11th-century tower. We were the only guests. The picture on the right shows the hostel tower. (Trust me, it's not easy to make good pictures of tall structures from narrow winding streets.)

This sets the theme for most of the towns and villages we visit for the rest of the tour - they are all incredibly charmingly ancient and authentic, unspoiled by tourism and past centuries and, in some cases, millenia. It's like people living in big living monuments of the past, and making it look as if it were the most normal thing in the world. I don't think you can find this anywhere else in the world; even the French are much quicker mingling old with new.

None of this, of course, stops the Italians from hurtling through their charming cobblestoned streets with noisy little automobiles or deafening two-stroke motorcycles.

See all 20 reports by Thomas Driemeyer

North Cape - Gibraltar, Approved by Guinness Book of World Records
by Erik Straarup, tour started 2000

The trip was an attemp to beat Fritz Hansens record from 1999. He did the trip in 20 dayes and nights, 3 hours and 12 minutes. I also went for his average of 289 km a day.

Why alone? It gives you some satisfaction, to know you did the trip alone, and without any help. If you bike in a group, you have to adapt yourself to the groups choice of route and daily distance. When you are alone you are completely free to follow your own rhythm.

See all 4 reports by Erik Straarup

Map
Around the lakes (French Alps, Switzerland, Jura)
by Jean-Pierre Jacquot, tour started 2000

These pages are a recollection of our 2000 summer tour. Ending a century, and even more a millenium, should be memorable. As you will read, it was, but not exactly for the best of reasons:-) This year destination was suggested by Martine: not directly and not consciously thought. Not even willingly:-) One day, she mentioned lakes as a good holiday destination. She was refering to Chambon, secretly hoping we could pitch the tent once and for all near a nice beach where she could find inspiration for excuses for letting me going alone on daily rides:-) Lakes? Yes, that's an idea! What about visiting some of the great Alpine lakes: Annecy, le Bourget, le Léman, Neuchatel, ..?

See all 5 reports by Jean-Pierre Jacquot

Corsica by bicycle
by Norman D. Ford, tour started 2000
Europe: France

In autumn 2,000, I spent 19 days cycling around this compact Mediterranean island on some of the most spectacular seacoast and mountain roads on earth. Day after day, I pedalled along clifftop roads high above the sea with a balcony view of the wild, rocky coast. In the interior, I cycled on quiet backroads through rugged gorges and to ancient villages perched high in the mountains. Traffic was mostly light and each night I stayed at a comfortable hotel in mountain villages or at beach resorts or fishing harbors or under the massive walls of medieval citadels. My route took me completely around Cap Corse and to the awsome heights of the col de Bavella, and I visited Corte, Bastia, St. Florent, Ile Rousse, Calvi, Porto, Ajaccio, Propriano, Porto Vecchio and Bonifacio. Day by day, this report describes exactly how I did it with loads of advice to help you experience Corsica by exactly the same route.

See all 13 reports by Norman D. Ford

France 2000 - Provence and Camargue
by Stefano Lugli, tour started 2000
Europe: France
language: it

Avignon - Nîmes - S.tes Maries de la Mer - Arles - Avignon.

See all 10 reports by Stefano Lugli

Tourmalet - The Hard Way
by Geoff Husband, tour started 2000
Europe: France

The statistics are frightening, the Tourmalet is a ``Hors Catagorie'' climb, the most difficult of all, and a rare beast indeed. The Col is at 2115 m, nearly 7000 feet, the second highest in the Pyrenees and by repute, the most difficult. If you look at the Michelin map you'll see the road, previously marked in yellow, becomes made up of red and yellow dots. I've only seen this on a couple of sections of road in France and means that the road is very dangerous. But for the cycletourist it has two saving graces, firstly it is generally a steady though hard climb, the second is that it is so stunningly beautiful that by the top the part of you which will hurt most will be your neck from craning around at some of the most spectacular scenery in cycling.

See all 8 reports by Geoff Husband

Top
Torino - Capo Finisterre
by Stefano Lugli, tour started 2000
Europe: France, Italy, Spain
language: it

Il seguente viaggio cicloturistico ripercorre una delle vie di pellegrinaggio utilizzate fino dal secolo IX per raggiungere le ``estreme terre della cristianità'' e il sepolcro dell'Apostolo Santiago (San Giacomo Maggiore). Durante questi 2000 chilometri si attraversa ogni paesaggio, dalle Alpi ai Pirenei, dal Mediterraneo all'Atlantico passando per zone montane e pedemontane, altopiani, prati, campi coltivati, fiumi, città d'arte, semplici villaggi, ecc., ecc. Il tratto in territorio spagnolo è meglio conosciuto come Camino de Santiago, Chemin de St. Jacques o Cammino Reale Francese ed è stato dichiarato ``Patrimonio dell'Umanità'' dall'UNESCO e ``Itinerario Culturale Europeo'' dal Consiglio d'Europa dal 1987.

See all 10 reports by Stefano Lugli

A days ride to Port d'Aula - An october passage into the Spanish Pyrenees over rough track
by Stuart Kendall, tour started October 1999
Europe: France

Includes very nice pictures. I had come for a holiday in the pyrenees to ride some of the cols I had seen during telecasts of the Tour de France . ,I decided to to tackle something over 2000m in altitude inspired by a picture I had seen and a sense of adventure I made my decision . The Port d'Alua at 2260m on the French/Spanish border . Although myself a roadie (now converted roadie /mountain biker ) at my hosts advice I geared up for this ride as a mountain biker as the last 12km or so are on a gravel road and mountain and mountain trail.

Cycling Holiday 1999: Bordeaux to Toulouse
by Mick Carter, tour started September 1999
Europe: France

Here are some notes from the cycling holiday that we did in September 1999. It was a leisurely trip from Bordeaux to Toulouse passing through more interesting places than we expected. The tour included several spectacular medieval towns, picturesque villages, vineyards and chateaux. The landscape was varied, with rolling hills, impressive gorges and the odd cave to visit.

Avignon - Dijon
by Amici della Bici di Brescia, tour started August 1999
Europe: France
language: it

Nicely done, with pictures and practical information.

Jacobsweg 1999
by Regula Baumberger and Alois Renn, tour started July 1999
language: de

Wir folgen nun weitgehend den Spuren der Pilger, wobei wir mit unseren Rennrädern natürlich auf der Landstrasse bleiben. Das erste Pässchen - die Hulftegg - fordert etwas Schweiss und wir geniessen die Wärme in der Abfahrt. Das Tösstal ist am Montagvormittag von Autos entvölkert und schnell erreichen wir Schmerikon am Zürichsee. Hier gibt's Kalorien für die nächste Stufe. Die Sattelegg lässt uns reichlich schwitzen und bei leichtem Rückenwind beginnen wir langsam zu kochen. Die Passhöhe erläst uns und bis Einsiedeln sind wir schon wieder abgekühlt. Wir zünden in der Klosterkirche eine Kerze an, fällen die Bidons am grossen Brunnen und weiter geht's über den Sattel nach Schwyz, mit einem herrlichen Blick auf den Lauerzersee.

See all 3 reports by Regula Baumberger and Alois Renn

Scallop shell signposts mark the route
le Tour '99
by Magnus Käck, tour started June 1999
Europe: France

A logbook with photographs of a tour starting in Paris.

Iberia Tour
by Erik Carlsson & Eric Salomonsson, tour started 1999
Europe: France, Spain

The Iberia Tour 1999 is our longest journey so far, both in distance and number of days. We went by air from Norrköping in Sweden to Paris on the 9th of June. From Paris, we first travelled southwards to Orléans, then followed the River Loire to Tours, went on to Bourdeaux where we turned towards southeast and followed River Garonne to Toulouse. From Toulouse we began to climb up the Pyrenees and arrived in the mini-country Andorra on the 20th of June. One day later we left Andorra and rode down to Barcelona in two days, then followed the coast to Andalucia, left the coast for Sierra Nevada, Granada and Ronda and arrived in Gibraltar. After a short visit to the African continent, we went on to Seville and then followed the coast to the Portuguese border and further on to the most south-western point of the European continent; Cabo de São Vicente. We arrived in Lisbon five days later on the 29th of July. The total distance amounted to 4630 km and we had 49 days of active bicycling and 4 days of resting. It was just not our longest journey so far, but also the hilliest and the hottest journey, in Spain the temperature at daytime was steadily above 30 degrees Celsius.

See all 7 reports by Erik Carlsson & Eric Salomonsson

Eric riding south of Peñíscola on the Spanish east coast
Tour of the Alps 1999
by Jobst Brandt, tour started 1999

We stopped at the gazebo with two flavors of rusty, bubbly mineral water, that give strength to those who dare climb this hill, before heading up the Gavia. It starts as a smooth wide two lane road with center stripe and a collage of warning signs that might make the wary traveler wonder what's going on. Land slides, falling rock, dangerous narrow road, and a chain requirement from September to July, are not the usual fare for mountain roads. After a short climb, past the first hairpin, reality strikes as the road goes from highway to driveway width and the 16% sign of poster fame sets the tone.

I was impressed with the aesthetics of ANAS, the highway department. They seem to have grasped the beauty of the Gavia and stopped the march of man against nature, right there where it meets the mountain. The road has lost nothing through paving. It is exactly the same narrow one lane Gavia that it always was. I have never seen a road so thoughtfully restored without a gratuitous widening job, but here it is. I hope it never changes. We continued through the thinning larch forest, up the east side of the canyon, finally rising above tree line. Here only thick bushy grass and wildflowers cover slopes where going off the road assures a long tumble to the Frigidolfo, far below.

See all 20 reports by Jobst Brandt

In the mist of time (Auvergne et Périgord)
by Jean-Pierre Jacquot, tour started 1999
Europe: France

These pages are a recollection of our 1999 summer holidays. As summer approaches, the usual question comes more pressing: Where? For Martine with a bit of worry, for Nicolas with the ``I-will-be-against-anyway'' enthusiasm of youth, and for the grand-parents with a ``what-will-they-invent-this-year'' nod of the head. Of course, Simon will say as his brother. Satisfying everybody will be hard:-) There are two innovations this year: Simon will peddle his way on his trailer bike and we will try mountains. The general theme then begins to take form. We will ride through the mist of time, first with geology, then with prehistory.

Once the general theme is defined, the route planing process is straightforward. Start point: Clermont-Ferrand, end point: Surzur. Must see places: Le Puy de Dôme, Bort les Orgues, Padirac, Rocamadour, Pech Merl, Les Eyzzies, Lascaux. In between, the detailed route will be planed on a day by day basis, depending on weather, tiring, and mood of the gang.

See all 5 reports by Jean-Pierre Jacquot

Loire River Valley, France, Bicycle Tour
by Don LaVange, tour started 1999
Europe: France

We have done the Bicycle tour of the Loire some 14 times with a variety of friends. Many times with our friend Bill Ransom [...] who passed away this year. We have toured other areas of France, but nothing quite compares with the Loire. We also enjoy trips to Civil War locations and we are eager for cycling companions.

See all 2 reports by Don LaVange

Loire River Valley
by Don LaVange, tour started 1999
Europe: France

This trip and variations of it have been ridden about 14 times by us. [...] This is a moderate mileage trip with the longest required riding day of around 50 miles. The shortest is about 22 and the rest fall in between. It can easily be extended in mileage or in time by spending two days in each location and riding a loop one day from each location.

See all 2 reports by Don LaVange

Yet Another Bicycle Tour in Southern France
by Michel Laliberté, tour started October 1998
Europe: France

A nice job, with particularly good pictures.

A solo, 21 days, 1300 km (800 miles) tour starting from Toulouse and ending in Marseille, going through the Canal de la Garonne, Quercy and Périgord (a very good place to start a bicycle tour in France), the prehistoric sites in the Dordogne and Vézère Valleys, the Aveyron uplands, the Canal du Midi, a string of medieval cities from Carcassonne to Arles, and the Mediterranean Coast.

See all 7 reports by Michel Laliberté

Bicycling Through Europe 1998 - Chronicles of Bill and Matt's Excellent Adventure
by Bill Venners, tour started September 1998

A tour through Germany, France, Switzerland and Austria by Bill Venners, from Autumn Leaf Cafe - an anthology of ideas and adventures.

From September 7th through October 8th, 1998, I rode my bicycle through the towns, forests, fields, hills and mountains of Europe. I was accompanied by my friend Matt, with whom I'd taken two previous bike trips.

This web site is a travelogue of my European bike tour. [...]

Table of Contents - Annotated links to all the pages; The Travelogue - Stories, data, and pictures from the trip; The Numbers - A table of bicycle and push-up data; The Not-Anal-Retentive Packing List - What to take (and where to put it).

Copyright © 1996-2001 Bill Venners. All rights reserved.

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