This page was last updated Fri 11 August 2017.

Contents: Tours (19)    Sites (1)    Cycling info pages (1)   

Liechtenstein (all)


All descriptions are in English, unless otherwise noted.

Tours

Tour of the Alps 2016
by Piaw Na, tour started July 2016, submitted 12 October 2016

From July 5th to July 26th, along with Arturo Crespo and Pengtoh Sim, I covered 1988km of riding with 35310m of climbing in Switzerland, Italy, Austria, Liechtenstein, Germany, and France. We had 2 flat tires, 1 minor mechanical on Arturo Crespo's bike, one major upgrade on Peng-Toh Sim's bike. We rode every day, with one rest day in Baden-Baden with relatively minor riding.

See all 12 reports by Piaw Na

Passo Gavia
Self-supported Tour of the Alps 2014
by Piaw Na, tour started July 2014, submitted 20 August 2014
Europe: Switzerland, Italy, Austria, Liechtenstein

This is the tour report for my 2014 Tour of the Alps. Hina Naseer and Arturo Crespo joined me for the trip, which took us through Switzerland, Italy, Austria and Lichtenstein. The trip was 1687.12 km (1048 miles) and 32969. 6m (108168 feet) of climb in 22 riding days, of which we had 3 days interrupted by weather and 1 day interrupted by a crash. We had 1 flat tire and1 mechanical due to a derailleur cable coming loose. My bike got lost in transit on the way to Zurich costing us a full day and a half of riding.

See all 12 reports by Piaw Na

Bike portage from Englestalp to Tannalp
Riding in Europe, Alps
by Ray Hosler, tour started 1985, submitted 22 August 2012
Europe: Italy, Austria, Liechtenstein

The Alps have long been a summer and winter playground for vacationers around the world. They ski, they hike, they ride bikes. What better venue for the Tour de France than the Alps? After many years of reading, seeing, and dreaming, I had an opportunity to see Europe by bike. As a free-lance writer working part-time at Palo Alto Bicycles, I had no commitments. It was 1985. Greg LeMond had nearly won the Tour de France and was competing in the World Championships in Italy. I decided to go see him race. A friend who was familiar with riding in Europe gave valuable advice.

See all 2 reports by Ray Hosler

Il Reno dalle sorgenti a Basilea (the Rhin from the source to Basel)
by webmaster - castione.ch, tour started August 2008, submitted 18 February 2010
Europe: Switzerland, Liechtenstein, Germany
language: it

Il Reno, fiume europeo per eccellenza, via d'acqua e di commercio, fonte di sostentamento e di ricchezza delle genti che da sempre si sono inseduate lungo le sue rive; oltre 1'300 chilometri molti dei quali sono diventati confini naturali degli stati che attraversa, dalla Svizzera all'Olanda passando per Francia e Germania.

Il Reno è uno dei simboli dell'Europa, le sue rive uno dei tracciati piú frequentati dai cicloviaggiatori. Questa è la prima tappa di un viaggio che intende percorrerlo tutto, dalle sue sorgenti nel cuore delle Alpi fino alla foce nel mare del nord, dai paesaggi naturali quasi incontaminati a una fra le aree industriali piú vaste del continente.

Lungo il cammino non mancherà l'occasione di visitare alcune città, alla scoperta della storia, dell'arte e della cultura d'Occidente.

La prima tappa del viaggio lungo il corso del Reno ha inizio nelle Alpi, nel cantone dei Grigioni e piú precisamente sul passo dell'Oberalp dove si trova una delle sorgenti del fiume, quella del Reno anteriore (Vorderrhein); l'altra sorgente, quella del Reno posteriore (Hinterrhein) si trova nei pressi del passo del San Bernardino.

Il fiume termina la prima parte della sua corsa nel lago di Costanza (Bodensee) a Fussach, in Germania, per poi formarsi di nuovo a Stein am Rhein (Svizzera).

See all 2 reports by webmaster - castione.ch

Coira, il castello di Marschlins
Summer cycling from Hungary to Morocco and across Canada
by Alfred Maleczki, tour started 2006, submitted 28 March 2009
language: hu

A lonely Hungarian cyclist who has the Summers free and likes to make new advantures on his bike.

Started with his short Croatian tours, but made it always longer, and in 2005 didn't stop before the 2700th kilometer in Greece. In the following year he decided to start the real adventure, to cycle out of Europe.

2007 was the year of cycling across Canada, the headwindy way - of course :) After this 9000km trip now he is in the planning stage of the South-American tour for 2009.

Atlas mountains, Morocco
Tour of the Alps 2008
by Jerry Nilson, tour started 2008, submitted 3 January 2009

The goal this Summer was to make sure I have climbed every asphalted (at least one side) pass throughout the whole of the Alps above 1700m (which I have detailed in a list at the cycloclimbing.com site). I also wanted to include some difficult roads that are not passes.

(Length: 4916.7 km for 29 days = 170 km/day; Height metres climbed: 105454 m for 29 days = 3636m/day.)

See all 13 reports by Jerry Nilson

Klammljoch/Passo di Gola (2288m)
Bassano (Venice area) to Zurich by bike
by Fabio Ferronato, tour started June 2008, submitted 19 June 2008
Europe: Italy, Switzerland, Liechtenstein

Cycling from Bassano (Venice) to Zurich, passing Ofenpass, Flüelapass and Albulapass. Google maps + gps tracking files included.

See all 9 reports by Fabio Ferronato

Closing to Bergün and Albulapass
International Cycle Traveling, solo and self contained
by Peter Davis, tour started 2008, submitted 31 March 2008

I'm at one of those grave intellectual impasses that have been known to bring even greater minds than my own to a standstill. I have an orphan sock. Trivia, you say. Ha! I think not.

The cause of this problem is surely the work of that Slovakian KGB Agent, foolishly disguised as a laundress in Svolen. She stole it, I'm sure. Probably for a DNA sample to impress her superiors in Bratislava. They've been following my every move since the kustoms agent in Warsaw asked me the purpose of my visit to Poland. When I answered ``vacation'' the disbelief on his face gave him away. What, doesn't anyone go to Poland on vacation?

But back to the real problem, the orphan sock. The purists among cycle tourists would say, ``Throw it away, it's excess baggage. And while you're at it, cut three inches off that over-long toothbrush handle.'' But the Calvinist in me says, ``Save it. It's a good sock, nearly new.'' I've already reduced the weight of my baggage by losing its mate. Maybe I'll lose another and be back to even and lighter still.

See all 2 reports by Peter Davis

Gerloss Pass, Austria 2006
Bikerfab - travels and trips by bicycle
by Fabio Mannino, submitted 24 September 2007
language: it, en

Il ciclismo è sofferenza. Il premio è la cima di una montagna o una città a 2000km da casa. Se questo premio vi sembra adeguato allora la domanda ``ma chi te lo fa fare ?'' ha già una risposta. Se non vi sembra abbastanza, semplicemente non potete capire chi pedala.

Cycling is suffering. The prize is the top of a mountain or a city 2000km far from home. If this prize seems you enough, then the question ``why do you do that ?'' already has an answer. If you don't find it enough, you just cannot understand cyclists.

Missile ucraino davanti ad una stazione di servizio in Polonia - Ukrainian rocket in front of a fuel station in Poland
Basel to Bellinzona
by Mark Fenwick, tour started September 2006, submitted 9 September 2007
Europe: Switzerland, Liechtenstein, Austria

Another shorter than expected tour, this time in Switzerland, generally following Veloroute 2 (the Rhein Route) from Basel past Rheinfall, Bodensee, Liechtenstein and Chur to Andermatt via Oberalp pass, then over St Gotthard pass and onto the Italian border.

In what seems to be the theme of his years tours, events conspired to thwart the original plan of connecting July's tour (Copenhagen to Freiberg) with it's intended destination: Venice.

A freak, non-cycling related, knee injury on the third evening left me unable to bend my left leg; which meant the only way I was getting to Venice was by train.

Despite this (and the fact that it rained solidly for two and a half of the four days on the bike), it was still an enjoyable tour with some great sights and new personal achievements.

See all 8 reports by Mark Fenwick

St Gotthard Pass
The Rhine, the whole Rhine & nothing about the Rhine.
by simon mitchell, tour started August 2006, submitted 24 June 2007

The clock was ticking, I was one hour off C-Day with everything packed. I had gone through my checklist time & time again fully knowing that as always with my memory I was bound to have forgotten something.

[...]

3 days in, the sun had come out and I was settling down into my monotonous click, click of turning peddles, I was just dwelling on trying to figure out how many revolutions I'll need to turn these things to get me to my final destination, when In front of me not 30m away was a police car blocking the tow-path. On closer inspection its inhabitants were, as I first thought just having a crafty fag break down on the River embankment. But what was he trying to cover up with that white blanket? Like a puzzle it all clicked in, he was covering up a dead body & as it looked (why did I look) a pretty decomposed one at that!

Retching was not a clever idea when you're in a strong head wind & speeding at 25km. But the sight of that body will stick with me for the rest of my life.

Was this the way it was supposed to be? I was planning a pleasant cycle trip along the Rhine to chill out and clear my muddled head of all my earthly problems! But this was turning into a Hollywood horror movie & I was the sucker, who you always knew, was first up to get mutilated.

Well did I survive to tell the tale, did I find the inner me that I was looking for? Read on & find out!

Bicycle Travelling in 24 Countries
by Peter Davis, tour started June 2005, submitted 4 February 2006

This webpage is intended to provide information for cycle tourists who may be considering tours in the countries I've visited. For more information, journals and pictures leave a message in my guestbook or send me an email.

`` Yes, it's hot. But we've seen worse haven't we my friend. There was that day east of Warnambol when the chip seal melted and the chips stuck to the tires. A few revolutions later we had flats front and rear. So we pushed for a mile seeking shade to repair the punctures. And the flies Ah! And there was that time in Zamorah. Ah! But not now.''

See all 2 reports by Peter Davis

Mountains, Rivers and Rivieras
by Justin Belcher, tour started April 2005, submitted 29 January 2006

It began as a crazy idea whilst on holiday in France back in 2003 and within a couple of weeks had turned into a serious plan. Now after two years preparation and a couple of false starts we're finally off.

The plan is to ride from our home in Chesham to the south coast city of Portsmouth where we can catch a boat to Bilbao on the north coast of Spain. Then we'll cross France to the Black Forest in Germany where we can pick up the famous Danube cycle path which we plan to follow to east to Vienna. After that we want to spend a couple of months in the Alps before heading south for a lap of Italy. The final leg of the tour will see us cross France again to the Pyrenees before we head south to Spain where we plan to follow the coast round to Portugal and back into Northern Spain where we can catch the boat back to England.

See all 2 reports by Justin Belcher

Jerry's Tour of the Alps 2004
by Jerry Nilson, tour started July 2004, submitted 15 January 2006

22 full days of cycling (I cycled a little the first day upon arriving at Nice and cycled 81 km on a travel day). I visited around 115 mountain passes. A total of 3532 km for 22 days (161 km/day). I climbed ca. 73078 m (3322 m/day). Maximum inclination/steepness: walking: 33% up Col de Traversette in snow; 42% down Grand col de Ferret. Steepest cycling was perhaps up Monte Zoncolan with 6 km at around 15% on average. Most difficult was probably Koralpenstrasse with an average gradient of 11,2% for the final 14,4 km, which make it into one of the hardest climbs in the Alps that could be cycled with a normal racer cycle. From snow to blazing sun around Nice. From Nice to Lavamünd and back again.

See all 13 reports by Jerry Nilson

Col du Sabot, Alps, France
Austria e Liechtenstein
by Davide Tambuchi, tour started 2004, submitted 28 December 2005
Europe: Austria, Switzerland, Liechtenstein
language: it

Quest'anno mi sono spostato un po' più ad est, visitando il piccolo Liechtenstein e la parte occidentale dell'Austria, sino a Salisburgo, con un ulteriore sconfinamento nella Baviera meridionale. Sempre con la mia fida Cannondale F600, e con lo stesso bagaglio dello scorso anno.

See all 15 reports by Davide Tambuchi

Bicycle tours in Switzerland and Austria
by Davide Tambuchi, tour started 2000, submitted 5 November 2005
Europe: Switzerland, Austria, Liechtenstein
language: it

In this page you can find some links to my bicycle tour in Switzerland, Austria and Liechtenstein, from year 2000. From 2004 there are some photos available.

See all 15 reports by Davide Tambuchi

Europe by bike II: Budapest to Gibraltar
by Glenn and Sheila Ord, tour started 1998

Theft Incidents:

  • Muesli and milk (fox suspected); Germany
  • Dog chewing Glenn's dinner plate; France
  • Cat burgler..feline attempt at food in tent vestibule; Spain

See all 5 reports by Glenn and Sheila Ord

Ord's Bike Guide to Europe
by Glenn and Sheila Ord, tour started 1998

From Glenn and Sheila Ord's Home Page: On the Road to Nowhere - Nowhere is the Place. With an emphasis on budget travelling - Our experiences and advice for cycling in Europe. This guide is entirely based on our 7 1/2 months (12,000 km) in 1998 across (and back) Europe: staying almost entirely in campgrounds (185 tent nights). This was supplemented by our time in Italy (April-May 1999).

See all 5 reports by Glenn and Sheila Ord

Archivio salite d'Europa/European climbs
by Voronin
language: it, de, fr, en

Tabular data and altitude profiles of mountain passes all over Europe.

Sites

Reiseberichte
by Karl Brodowsky
language: de

A massive travel site, this guy has been everywhere.

Hier finden sich einige deutschsprachige Reiseberichte von Fahrradtouren, die hoffentlich unterhaltsam und informativ sind, aber auch vielleicht die eine oder andere Anregung für Leute geben, die selber einmal so etwas machen wollen. Für englischsprachige Radtourenberichte habe ich hier auch einen Anfang gemacht, ebenso für schwedischsprachige Radtourenberichte, wobei noch ein bißchen auf norwegisch und dänisch dabei ist, aber diese drei skaninavischen Sprachen sind so ähnlich, daß man entweder alle drei ein bißchen lesen kann oder eben keine davon.

See all 16 reports by Karl Brodowsky

Cycling info pages

The Twizi hostel directory - the cheapest places to stay on the planet
by Patrick Sexton, , submitted 6 January 2007

[The author travels around the world and reviews hostels, and has built up a large hostel directory.]

What are hostels?

The quickest answer I can give to you is that hostels are budget accommodations where you share a room with other travelers. To be more specific though and to give you a better idea of what to expect I will say that a hostel room is like a hotel room but instead of being just one bed there are a couple (or a few) bunk beds. There are also (gasp!) other people. People you do not know! These other people are travelers who are most likely very much like you in the sense that they are exploring and traveling and doing it as absolutely cheaply as possible. Hostels have been around a long long time. There are over 20,000 of them around the world. Hostels are very much a part of the culture of Europe, and are starting to be known in the USA as well. Hostels are a cheaper way of staying in a city where you do not live.

world map